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James G. Hanes presents Certificates of Merit from the National Urban League, 1950.

James G. Hanes presents Certificates of Merit from the National Urban League, 1950.

James G. Hanes (right), Chairman of the Community Relations Project, presents Certificates of Merit from the National Urban League, 1950. The recipients are: Dan Andrews, Jr., Stella Bradshaw, and Dr. H. Rembert Malloy.

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  1. The doctor shown in the picture above is Dr. H. Rembert Malloy, my cousin. His father was a doctor as well as my Grandfather, William Malloy, Rembert’s Uncle, and Dr. Braxton Malloy, Rembert’s first cousin, my uncle. Dr. Darius Malloy, Rembert’s father my uncle, worked on the discovery of the first blood bank at Howard University as Dr.Drew’s assistant doctor. We had a family of five medical doctors. My Grandfather and Dr. D. Malloy provided for the men of the family to attend medical school. They were good friends with a neighbor of theirs who later became a famous horn player named Dizzy Gillespie, real name John Burke. They attended Laurinburg Institute where Lawrence Malloy, Rembert’s first cousin and best friend, played in the high school band with Dizzy. Dr. Rembert Malloy had a lovely wife and only one son and one grandson both named after him. As doctor and surgeon Dr. H. Rembert Malloy performed very difficult operations in his career as I recall; (Jet Magazine, March, 10, 1955; is a published interview regarding this.) I praise God for being raised among such wonderful friends and family members. The history is long and I wish to do a story/play on it one day as my daughter is now a writer, choreographer and performer on Broadway NYC. Thank you. Lauretta Malloy.

  2. Up date :The doctor shown in the picture above is Dr. H. Rembert Malloy, my cousin. His father was a doctor as well (Dr. Darius Malloy)as well as the brother of Darius my Grandfather, William Malloy, Rembert’s Uncle, and Dr. Braxton Malloy, Rembert’s first cousin, my uncle.
    Dr.H. Rembert Malloy, worked on the discovery of the first blood bank at Howard University as
    Dr. Drew’s assistant doctor. ( Research; The Charles Drew Papers:)
    We had a family of five medical doctors. My Grandfather and Dr. D. Malloy provided for the men of the family to attend medical school. They were good friends with a neighbor of theirs who later became a famous horn player named Dizzy Gillespie, real name John Burke. They attended Laurinburg Institute where Lawrence Malloy, Rembert’s first cousin and best friend, played in the high school band with Dizzy.
    Dr. H. Rembert Malloy had a lovely wife and only one son and one grandson both named after him. As doctor and surgeon Dr. H. Rembert Malloy performed very difficult operations in his career as I recall; (Jet Magazine, March, 10, 1955; is a published interview regarding this.) I praise God for being raised among such wonderful friends and family members. The history is long and I wish to do a story/play on it one day as my daughter is now a writer, choreographer and performer for Broadway NYC. and both she and I have worked, choreographed/performed for Mercedes Benz -Fashion Week Paris and NYC.
    Thank you for reading.
    Lauretta Malloy Noble.

  3. Dr. Malloy was my Godfather. He was the most loving, interesting, and giving person I knew. Having “Gramps” as I lovingly called him was an additional staple in my life. My parents could not have selected a better person to take care of me in the event they could not. Gramps inspired me in every step of my life and career. The wealth of knowledge and historical stories of times gone by have contributed to my love of history. His contributions to the community and true love for his family, God, and patients are what grounded him and made him the remarkable Gramps that I grew to love. I miss and love you Gramps.

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